Burgess Hill: ‘Positive’ Libby inspires mum to run marathon

Bone Cancer. Libby Trotter (12,  has had to have  her  right arm aputated after devoloping bone cancer. Libby's mum, Claire Trotter, is running the Brighton Marathon on the 12th April to raise money for the charity, Children with Cancer UK.  Pictured are  Claire and Libby. ''Picture: Liz Pearce'LP1500609 SUS-150323-201850008
Bone Cancer. Libby Trotter (12, has had to have her right arm aputated after devoloping bone cancer. Libby's mum, Claire Trotter, is running the Brighton Marathon on the 12th April to raise money for the charity, Children with Cancer UK. Pictured are Claire and Libby. ''Picture: Liz Pearce'LP1500609 SUS-150323-201850008
  • 12-year-old Oakmeeds pupil Libby Trotter was diagnosed with bone cancer last year
  • She had surgery to remove her arm and shoulder and is still receiving treatment
  • But Libby’s positive attitude has inspired her mum Claire to run a marathon

A ‘brilliant’ 12-year-old who lost her arm battling bone cancer has inspired her mum to run a marathon.

Libby Trotter, of Western Road, Burgess Hill was diagnosed with Osteosarcoma after she fractured her arm at just 11 years old.

Bone Cancer. Libby Trotter (12,  has had to have  her  right arm aputated after devoloping bone cancer. Libby's mum, Claire Trotter, is running the Brighton Marathon on the 12th April to raise money for the charity, Children with Cancer UK.  Pictured is Libby Trotter. 'Burgess Hill. Sussex. ''Picture: Liz Pearce'LP1500606 SUS-150323-201817008

Bone Cancer. Libby Trotter (12, has had to have her right arm aputated after devoloping bone cancer. Libby's mum, Claire Trotter, is running the Brighton Marathon on the 12th April to raise money for the charity, Children with Cancer UK. Pictured is Libby Trotter. 'Burgess Hill. Sussex. ''Picture: Liz Pearce'LP1500606 SUS-150323-201817008

But the Oakmeeds student, who had just started her first year at the school has been ‘so positive’ following the major surgery, her mother Claire has decided to run a marathon.

“It was all a bit of a whirlwind,” said Claire.

“She was diagnosed with Osteosarcoma at the beginning of September.

“The plan was to have ten weeks chemo and surgery to remove the tumour and take the bone out to be replaced.

The school and Libby’s friends have been amazing.

Claire Trotter

“But we found the cancer had grown – it had got bigger and it was going into her shoulder.

“The priority is to get the while thing out but it was too close to the nerves and the blood vessels.

“She was brilliant. She was gutted and said ‘I can’t have it done’, but she was in agony.”

Claire said when Libby realised her arm had to come off, she accepted it adding she would be glad not to have the pain.”

Libby is naturally right handed, but since the operation she has been practising to write with her left hand.

“She was doing the alphabet as soon as she could,” said Claire.

“I think she must have been ambidextrous. We were all wondering how she could do it.

“She has dealt with it so well. The fact that she has been so positive has made it easier for us too.”

Libby is able to dress herself and is very independent.

“It’s just silly things like zips or cutting something,” Claire added.

Libby is still having treatment and is on her fifth cycle of chemotherapy – but has still made it into school in her weeks off.

“The school and Libby’s friends have been amazing.

“Social media has been great. She went onto Instagram when she found out she had cancer. Everyone was so supportive – even people she didn’t know.”

The family were on holiday in the New Forest last year, when Libby’s shoulder started swelling.

“We took her to Southampton Hospital. The doctors said it looked like she had an infection,” said Claire.

Libby had fallen over at school weeks before the holiday and fractured her arm.

“After eight weeks she wasn’t able to lift her shoulder.

“We thought maybe she should just have some physio.”

After getting test results back, Doctors confirmed to the family that it could be cancer.

Claire is now training to run a marathon in April to help prevent other children from having to deal with the disease.

“I don’t know what made me think I would have the time to train,” she said.

“I have never wanted to run a full marathon but I thought what a perfect time to raise some money.”

Claire has raised nearly £2,000 for Children with Cancer UK, the leading national charity dedicated to the fight against childhood cancer.

To sponsor her, visit www.justgiving.com/clairetrotter