Cash raised to support 11-year-old boy with rare brain tumour

Sumner and Susan Malik. Pic Steve Robards SR1722934 SUS-170918-113619001
Sumner and Susan Malik. Pic Steve Robards SR1722934 SUS-170918-113619001
  • Rare brain tumour is currently incurable
  • At lease £1,000 raised to support with prolonging boys life
  • Village hall at its most full in years

We want to do all we can to help prolong a child’s life.

That’s the message of the Handcross Ladies Association (HLA) who have raised cash to support a boy with a rare brain tumour.

Handcross Ladies Association Village Fayre. Pic Steve Robards SR1722905 SUS-170918-113542001

Handcross Ladies Association Village Fayre. Pic Steve Robards SR1722905 SUS-170918-113542001

The association was launched in January of this year after the women decided to have a more informal and social community group.

Keen to support local people while socialising, they agreed Sumner Malik, 11, who has Difuse Intrinsic Pontine Glioma (DIPG), was someone they wanted to help.

At least £1,000 was raised to support the cost of his treatment at a village sale last week.

Face painting, local produce and a raffle were among much of what was on offer.

Handcross Ladies Association Village Fayre. Pic Steve Robards SR1722922 SUS-170918-113554001

Handcross Ladies Association Village Fayre. Pic Steve Robards SR1722922 SUS-170918-113554001

Sarah Ellis, 51, committee member for HLA, says the team were impressed with the outcome.

She said: “What we do is all about bringing people together.

“There was such a buzz on the morning and the team who organised it are over the moon with the success the event had and the number of people that came.

“We love our community and plan to do events such as this maybe once or twice a year to support something in the village.”

DIPG is a terminal, paediatric form of brain cancer with currently no cure.

But doctors and hospitals around the world are carrying out pioneering research into treatment.

Mrs Ellis added: “I think anything we can do to help prolong Sumner’s life and support his treatment is very positive.

“To see more than 100 people come through the doors and be a part of this event is brilliant.

“The hall was full most of the morning with people walking around.

“There was a post on social media from a gentleman that came to it and he said he had never seen the hall that busy before.”

Barbara Mellish, 66, co-chairman of the association, said the whole experience was very humbling for everyone.

She said: “It is very humbling this is able to do something for the little boy who is fighting his illness with such bravery.

“It just makes you thankful your own children are well so you want to progress and get as much funding as possible.

“Sumner was at the event himself and we all felt so very humble.”

The association were nervous at first as they were unaware on how many people would turn up to the event.

And now they have been filled with confidence after an excellent turnout.

Last year a JustGiving page called Sunshine 4 Sumner raised £55,009. People can still continue to donate to support the boy directly through sunshine4sumner.com.

Camron Malik, 50, father of Sumner says he is appreciative of all the work from the ladies association.

He said: “We have needed this support. Without it we would be in trouble.

“It was a great day and we really are so thankful for everything these ladies have done.”

TDIPG is most commonly found in children between the ages of four and 11.

The median survival rate from diagnosis is nine months.

DIPG does not effect a person mentally, but does steal essential bodily functions such as vision, chewing, swallowing, walking and breathing.

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