Tackling the issues around dyslexia

Artist Paul Milton Copyright 2015 (c) SUS-150723-175521001

Artist Paul Milton Copyright 2015 (c) SUS-150723-175521001

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This newspaper introduces its latest columnist.

My name is Paul Milton professional artist, writer, and British Dyslexia Association Ambassador from Haywards Heath.

Dyslexia is a complicated subject as dyslexia affects many people in different ways; I was recently talking about Dyslexia and the understanding of dyslexia, as my role as an ambassador part of that is promoting the awareness and understanding of dyslexia.

Talking to these fellow dyslexics has inspired me to write this piece.

“Recently I have been talking to a lot of dyslexic people, or people who know people who are dyslexic every person’s story is different.”

In school I was told I was thick and stupid and wouldn’t amount to much” not the best of inspirational words, I use to be angry about it occasionally I still get upset about it, it still hurts and always will but I am now more mature, and wiser, I now realise my own potential and what I am capable of and what any person is capable of with just a little bit of self belief and resilience and good support from good decent people.

A good friend of mine summed up the keyword “perseverance. I was recently talking to this mother and child about what dyslexia was and trying to explain how it affects me and other people quite a nice moment.”

I explained to the mother and the child about dyslexia and how it affected me, but what surprised me was how bright the child was really interested in what dyslexia was and how it affected me. The child understood everything I was saying and explaining it was clearly obvious this child was very smart and bright.”

The child explained “how he loved writing and maths” his mum said “he loves writing and maths. I explained to them I hated maths too many figures but I felt inspired to write this piece of writing I was just so astounded at the intelligence of this child for such an age simply amazing.”

The child even observed I had numbers and writing written on my hand I explained “it reminds me of certain times and important information”

The mother said to her son “now that’s clever you see, using his intelligence using his head”

Every person’s story about dyslexia differs from people who decided not to pursue the help because they knew they wouldn’t get the help in the real world. From parents I’ve met where their children are dyslexic where they’ve struggled to get the help having to fight tooth and nail to get the help. I was recently asked the question “would I be doing art if I wasn’t dyslexic” which was a good question. I’ve been artistic from a very young age drawing and creating all the time I just enjoyed it a natural talent you might say. I feel lost not doing art it’s not a case of doing art, I have to do art like you have to breathe because I am an artist! My reverent said in church recently “he knew he wanted to be a reverent or go into the line of religion at the age of 10” in life you somehow know or get a natural nudge in the rigdirection you’re supposed to go for me it was art.

I wish the readers well and the community in Haywards heath and Balcombe well and to the bright sparks out there be proud to be different and unique.”

For more info www.paulmilton.co.uk, email: - info@paulmilton.co.uk

BDA, Bracknell Beeches, British Dyslexia Association Helpline:-0333 4054567. www.bdadyslexia.org.uk