'Eyesore' grass verge in Haywards Heath a safety hazard, claims resident

A Lindfield resident has hit out at the council over an ‘eyesore’ grass verge, which he claims has been neglected for nine years.

George Cox said he has to ring the council every year to ask them to come out and trim the verge, which is at the junction of Snowdrop Lane and the A272 on the eastern edge of Haywards Heath.

George Cox (inset) and the 'eyesore' grass verge in Haywards Heath. Photo by Steve Robards

George Cox (inset) and the 'eyesore' grass verge in Haywards Heath. Photo by Steve Robards

“I have been concerned about this area of grass verge which should be cut and looked after by the council,” said the 76-year-old, who has lived in the district for 29 years.

“I phoned up three weeks ago and they still haven’t done it, despite saying they would treat it as a matter of urgency.

“Apart from looking completely abandoned and neglected and a complete eyesore, it is also a safety hazard because one can’t see traffic coming from the Haywards Heath area, when emerging from Snowdrop Lane onto the A272.”

Mr Cox, who lives at The Rushes in Lindfield, got in touch after reading in our edition dated August 8, that grass cutting of West Sussex’s public verges was set to be reduced as part of a new highways maintenance plan.

The grass verge in Haywards Heath has been neglected for nine years, claims Mr Cox. Photo by Steve Robards

The grass verge in Haywards Heath has been neglected for nine years, claims Mr Cox. Photo by Steve Robards

“The grass verge here doesn’t seem to be trimmed at all anyway – nevermind it being reduced," he commented.

A spokesman for the county council said: “If owned by West Sussex County Council, this area of grass verge would fall under our rural grass cutting programme.

“We have asked an area engineer to inspect the site to determine who owns the land. The county council cuts all rural grass three times per year between March and November.

“This year we have amended our first rural cut to allow verges to become more established and help with our pollinators and seeding wildflowers.

“The second and third cuts have stayed the same.”