‘Fairtrade’ status for Mid Sussex village

Peter Desmond and Chris Lee of Fairtrade Lindfield with Val Upton, Vice-Chairman of Lindfield Parish Council SUS-180430-115426001
Peter Desmond and Chris Lee of Fairtrade Lindfield with Val Upton, Vice-Chairman of Lindfield Parish Council SUS-180430-115426001

Lindfield is now officially a Fairtrade Village following a two-year campaign.

The village has been awarded the status for its commitment to Fairtrade principles which aim to alleviate world poverty.

Several shops and cafes in the village have pledged to sell Fairtrade and fairly traded products and support has been given by Lindfield Parish Council, churches and voluntary groups.

Lindfield Parish Council vice chairman Val Upton said: “Lindfield Parish Council is pleased that the village has obtained Fairtrade status. Fairtrade is important as it changes the way trade works through better prices, decent working conditions and a fair deal for farmers and workers in developing countries.”

Fairtrade is an active and practical way to support small-scale farmers ensuring they earn decent incomes and have long-term contracts with companies. In addition, they earn the Fairtrade Premium, which they invest in vital business, social and environmental projects.

The Fairtrade mark can be found on more than 5,000 products globally including flowers, rice, cocoa and such like. Chris Lee, a member of the Fairtrade Lindfield Steering Group said: “When you are doing your weekly shop, maybe look out for the Fairtrade logo and make a difference to someone’s life. For example, by buying Fairtrade chocolate, you can enjoy the taste and know you are helping people in Ghana to send their children to school.”

Adam Gardner, communities xampaigns manager at the Fairtrade Foundation, said: “We are delighted to welcome Lindfield to the Fairtrade movement which now boasts more than 1,900 communities worldwide, taking practical steps to making a fairer world trade system a reality.

“Thanks to the support of consumers, an increasing number of farmers in developing countries are now selling their products on Fairtrade terms, bringing them a stable income, and the chance to trade their way out of poverty.

“Today, more than 1.6 million farmers and workers across 74 developing countries benefit from the international Fairtrade system, but there is still a long way to go.”