TV chef Jamie Oliver starts ‘egg revolution’ from Ditchling farm

Danny Macmillan, Peter Barton, Susie Macmillan, Jamie Oliver and Jimmy Doherty SUS-150201-130026001
Danny Macmillan, Peter Barton, Susie Macmillan, Jamie Oliver and Jimmy Doherty SUS-150201-130026001

Poultry farmers from Ditchling will help raise the issue of food waste – with a helping hand from TV chef Jamie Oliver.

Susie and Danny Macmillan who run The Mac’s Farm in Dumbrells Court will appear on Channel 4’s Friday Night Feast, explaining how they lose around £60,000 a year because no one eats little eggs.

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SUS-150201-125934001

Young pullet chickens lay small flavoursome eggs – but because most consumers want medium or large eggs these mini eggs are thrown on the scrapheap or used for liquid egg.

“To me, pullet eggs are a product at its best but we lose so much money on them,” said Susie.

“We’re only paid about 48p a dozen and on average we collect 8-10,000 eggs a day – 600,000 a year - from our chickens when they’re first laying.

“People don’t want these eggs because they’re small but actually pullet eggs have a really big yolk and less white, and are brilliant at holding together when cooked.”

“Everybody believes large eggs are what you need because a recipe says so, but you shouldn’t expect chickens to lay big eggs.

“Good welfare is allowing a chicken to lay an egg size that its body is naturally designed to do.”

The Ditchling farm will feature on the show on Friday January 9.

The programme aims to wage a war against food waste and started its run on Friday January 2, with an episode looking at vegetables thrown away because they are the wrong shape.

Farmer and Friday Night Feast presenter Jimmy Doherty said it is ‘unthinkable’ that more than 1.5 million small eggs are thrown on the scrapheap every day in the UK.

Jamie Oliver added: “The great British public are missing out on a premium, seasonal product and worse - farmers’ livelihoods are on the line.

“We want to kick start a mini-egg revolution.

“The supermarkets may not want them, but I reckon farmers could find a market for their huge volume of pullet eggs by selling them to restaurants and pubs.”