VIDEO: Animal rescue centre in search for a new home

A search for a new home has been launched by an animal rescue group which is having to make way for a major new redevelopment scheme.

The family-run Holbrook Animal Rescue has been operating from its current site in Old Holbrook, Horsham, for the past 25 years.

Holbrook Animal Rescue owners Laura and Cliff Santini with Laura's mum Sylvia Bradbury. The rescue centre has to find new premises because of redevelopment plans for the area in North Horsham. Pic Steve Robards SR1807357 SUS-180322-174308001

Holbrook Animal Rescue owners Laura and Cliff Santini with Laura's mum Sylvia Bradbury. The rescue centre has to find new premises because of redevelopment plans for the area in North Horsham. Pic Steve Robards SR1807357 SUS-180322-174308001

But it is now having to move because the north Horsham area - where the animal centre is sited - is earmarked for the building of 2,750 new homes, two schools, shops, a community centre, health facilities and sportsgrounds.

Laura Santini who runs the rescue group with her husband Cliff and mother Sylivia said: “We need a property or farm in the Horsham area with enough land to exercise our dogs and keep the sheep, horses, pig, and other animals that seem to have made this their home.”

Ideally, Laura said, they are looking for somewhere with around 20 acres of land, or with a field next door that would be available to buy.

“We need space to walk the dogs,” said Laura, “but we’re very open minded about where we live.”

They normally look after around 25 dogs, along with about 12 cats. They also have an aviary and three pet horses - with other horses from time to time that are awaiting rehoming.

Holbrook Animal Rescue was originally set up to help with the neutering, veterinary care and feeding of stray and abandoned dogs and cats.

“We take in many different types of animals and they all come from different backgrounds,” said Laura.

“We try to find good homes for them all - where possible – and often keep the old and sick ones as our own animals.”

The family first began their rescue work after being touched by the plight of New Forest foals facing slaughter for meat.

Since then, the family’s work has grown and, although mostly self-funded, they have been helped by public donations - and a band of dedicated volunteers.

Every penny of donations goes towards veterinary costs, feeding and general care of the animals.

“We aim to provide loving new homes for as many animals as we possibly can,” said Laura.

“These animals come from many different backgrounds but all have the same basic need - that of a home where they will be cared for and no longer live in fear or hunger.”